I’ve been MIA from this blog—for a good reason

Organ at Vang Kirke, Hamar, Norway. That's me at the console.

Organ at Vang Kirke, Hamar, Norway. That’s me at the console.

In 1968 in a small apartment where I lived on Sultana Avenue in Ontario, CA, I met a group of young men who were friends of a friend of mine. Our mutual friend, the late David Westerholm, was an extraordinarily gifted organist, a funny, strange little man whose insights about anything and everything made my thinking (and that of nearly everyone I knew) seem pedestrian and dull. I cherished David in a way I never have cherished any other person. He observed life, and he understood and spoke about what he saw without a filter of standard logic or needless propriety.

David made me (and everyone else) laugh, not at people, places, or things, but because of—through—them. All of life was part of a great cosmic joke, and he thought life was much more fun if one were in on the joke than if one were frightened of it or worried about it. But he was never trivial or mean.  I’m not saying he did not experience his own life and circumstances deeply and with great feeling. Or that he engaged in relationships superficially.

I met David when he was working on his master’s degree in organ at the University of Redlands from which I had graduated the previous year. His friends—classmates and longtime friends of his from Texas Lutheran College, now Texas Lutheran University—came to visit him. I should put a caveat here: this may have happened five years later when David and I were both doctoral students and living together at the University of Iowa. I’m not sure, and I can’t make a phone call at 5 AM to check my memory.

If you’ve read Dostoyevsky’s The Idiot, you will understand the regard in which I hold David when I say he reminded me of Князь Лев Никола́евич Мы́шкин (Prince Lev Nikolaevich Myshkin, the idiot). If you haven’t read The Idiot, don’t jump to conclusions. This is high praise indeed.

Last Thursday I looked for (briefly—about 30 seconds—because I was alone and trying to read the Russian was impossible) Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s grave in the cemetery of the Alexander Nevsky Monastery in St. Petersburg. I was there because Viktor Andersson, one of David’s TLC friends, and I reconnected some years back in Dallas. He is the director of music at Calvary Lutheran Church in Richland Hills, TX. He invited me to go along and do a bit of piano and organ accompanying for a singing tour the Calvary choir made in Scandinavia and St. Petersburg to benefit Novosaratovka Lutheran Seminary in St. Petersburg.

Travel, I had assumed for some time, would be one of the casualties of the retirement penury of my approaching senescence. Were it not for help from more than one quarter—for which I am more grateful than I can say—I would not have been able to make the trip. Viktor is unfortunate that he did not have a musician of David’s caliber to invite—David would not have missed a note or a beat.  Ah, well.

Russian Barbecue at Novosaratovka Lutheran Seminary in St. Petersburg.

Russian Barbecue at Novosaratovka Lutheran Seminary in St. Petersburg.

Our travel was not—in any way I can think of—normal touristry. We were together, twenty-four of us. We were a group of acquaintances at the beginning, and a group at the end of the two weeks. We spent most of our time in places such as Arvika, Sweden, and Eurajoki, Finland, towns I assume most tourists miss—but which are the essence of their cultures. We met and became acquainted with people who live and work in those places. We were treated with care and hospitality more by our new friends than by hotels, travel agents, and restaurants. We saw parts of those countries tourists most likely never see.

Lake Narvi near Eurajoki, Finland, near Rauma where we performed at Holy Cross Church. The church provided a scrumptious dinner for us at their camp by the lake and, for the brave—no, the smart—among us, a sauna experience with a jump in the lake.

The Vang Kirke at Hamar, Norway, ancestral home of one of our group. A private hour where I was thrilled (OK, it’s a trite word, but it’s the right one) to play the organ recently restored by the Schucke company of Germany.

Or St. Catherine Lutheran Church in St. Petersburg, where we performed last in our efforts to raise money—for the Seminary and the church. We know a bit about life in Russia today that very few Americans will ever see.

I don’t mean this to be a travelogue or a geopolitical essay or any kind of important reporting. Simply a statement of my personal gratitude that acquaintanceships from my youth can, in fact, mature into friendships that bring joy and satisfaction when I get out of the way and allow my life to unfold. Thank you, Dear David.

Go jump in the lake (Narvi, that is) while Viktor waxes flamboyant

One Response to I’ve been MIA from this blog—for a good reason

  1. Pingback: “. . . a lantern, burning in the midst of parenthetical opaqueness. . . “ (1) | Me, senescent

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